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We beez just as smart as whitey, when we fake our grades and test scores

Sometimes being dumb doesn’t matter.  If you have that Harvard degree in economics and go on to run a bank which is handed tons of cash regardless by the federal reserve, and you can print money out of thin air, well immediate millions.

But sadly things have gotten to be a bit much lately as more and more schools are caught faking the transcripts to get students into elite Universities. Landry is just the next in a long string of fraudsters. It’s like the Atlanta fake test score scandal, but this time its for big prizes big money!

A video of a 16-year-old student opening his Harvard acceptance letter last year has been viewed more than eight million times. Other Landry students went on to Yale, Brown, Princeton, Stanford, Columbia, Dartmouth, Cornell and Wesleyan.

In Reality – the school falsified transcripts, made up student accomplishments and mined the worst stereotypes of black America to manufacture up-from-hardship

Grotesque grading policies such as an instant “A” for scrawling your misspelled name on the paper were commonplace. If you could actually write a word it was an “A+”.  The kids spent the whole time studying for the ACT where they achieved ho hum average scores, but if you’re black, that’s HARVARD material!

The average ACT score between 2014 and 2017 was a 27 out of 36. The average score in Louisiana is 19.5. The school has a nontraditional curriculum based on a flexible, Montessori college-readiness program. For Comparison, Bronx Science, a respected High School in NYC scores an average ACT of 32.

“Weez just as smart as Whites!” screemed Dmirtious Malcom Jefferson pointing at his Harvard acceptance letter. Just as smart indeed.

How does an ACT of 27 stack up? At Vassar, the average ACT is 33. At Harvard it’s closer to 34.  Stanford is 33.5. Princeton? About 33. MIT about 34.

Buffalo University has an average ACT of 27.  There’s no way these kids deserve the ivy league.


Louisiana School Made Headlines for Sending Black Kids to Elite Colleges. Here’s the Reality.

T.M. Landry, a school in small-town Louisiana, has garnered national attention for vaulting its underprivileged black students to elite colleges. But the school cut corners and doctored college applications.

By Erica L. Green and Katie Benner, Nov. 30, 2018

BREAUX BRIDGE, La. — Bryson Sassau’s application would inspire any college admissions officer.

A founder of T.M. Landry College Preparatory School described him as a “bright, energetic, compassionate and genuinely well-rounded” student whose alcoholic father had beaten him and his mother and had denied them money for food and shelter. His transcript “speaks for itself,” the founder, Tracey Landry, wrote, but Mr. Sassau should also be lauded for founding a community service program, the Dry House, to help the children of abusive and alcoholic parents. He took four years of honors English, the application said, was a baseball M.V.P. and earned high honors in the “Mathematics Olympiad.”

The narrative earned Mr. Sassau acceptance to St. John’s University in New York. There was one problem: None of it was true.

“I was just a small piece in a whole fathom of lies,” Mr. Sassau said.

T.M. Landry has become a viral Cinderella story, a small school run by Michael Landry, a teacher and former salesman, and his wife, Ms. Landry, a nurse, whose predominantly black, working-class students have escaped the rural South for the nation’s most elite colleges. A video of a 16-year-old student opening his Harvard acceptance letter last year has been viewed more than eight million times. Other Landry students went on to Yale, Brown, Princeton, Stanford, Columbia, Dartmouth, Cornell and Wesleyan.

Landry success stories have been splashed in the past two years on the “Today” show, “Ellen” and the “CBS This Morning.” Education professionals extol T.M. Landry and its 100 or so kindergarten-through-12th-grade students as an example for other Louisiana schools. Wealthy supporters have pushed the Landrys, who have little educational training, to expand to other cities. Small donors, heartened by the web videos, send in a steady stream of cash.

T.M. Landry College Prep, a small private school in Louisiana, boasted about its record of sending black students from working-class families to top universities. But there’s more to the story.

In reality, the school falsified transcripts, made up student accomplishments and mined the worst stereotypes of black America to manufacture up-from-hardship tales that it sold to Ivy League schools hungry for diversity. The Landrys also fostered a culture of fear with physical and emotional abuse, students and teachers said. Students were forced to kneel on rice, rocks and hot pavement, and were choked, yelled at and berated.